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ATO launches Super Scheme Smart

Posted on September 29, 2016 by admin

The Australian Tax Office has launched a new initiative called Super Scheme Smart to help educate individuals about the pitfalls of certain retirement planning schemes and how to protect their retirement nest egg.

Each year the ATO discovers complex tax schemes and arrangements designed by promoters solely for the purpose of helping people avoid tax.

The office is currently seeing a number of schemes targeting Australians planning for their retirement. These schemes encourage individuals to channel money inappropriately through their self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF).

The penalties are substantial for those involved in deliberate tax avoidance schemes; an individual may well lose their right to be a trustee of their own super fund, or, in some cases, they could go to jail.

According to the ATO, individuals most at risk are those approaching retirement.

While the retirement planning schemes can vary, common features people should be aware of include schemes that:

– are artificially contrived with complex structures usually connecting with an existing or newly created SMSF

– involve a significant amount of paper shuffling

– are designed to give the taxpayer minimal or zero tax, or even a tax refund

– aim to give a present day tax benefit by adopting the arrangement

– invariably sound ‘too good to be true’, and as such they generally are

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When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

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