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Devising an SMSF investment strategy

Posted on May 24, 2016 by admin

An investment strategy is fundamental when it comes to self-managed super funds. Not only is having one a statutory requirement, but it also helps SMSF trustees know what to invest in to meet the fund’s investment goal.

Above all, an SMSF investment strategy must be designed to help trustees reach their retirement goal.

To do this, the strategy must outline the fund’s objectives. Every fund’s objective will be different and should reflect the circumstances of each fund member. For example, it must take into account the age and when each member plans to retire, existing assets inside and outside of super, each member’s current and future salary and ability to contribute to the fund. Importantly, it must also factor the ability of the fund’s assets to be sold within a specific time frame.

Taking into account the risk profile of each fund member will help the strategy determine what the fund invests in. In cases where the risk profile of each member differs, individual asset pools should be created to reflect individual members’ risk preferences.

SMSF strategies need to be reviewed regularly, especially during important life events, like when a member enters retirement, suffers from an illness, goes through a divorce or passes away. These events can have a substantial effect on how a fund operates e.g. if a member dies, a fund’s asset allocation may need to change so that the fund holds fewer high-risk assets.

While there is no such thing as a ‘one size fits all approach’ when it comes to an SMSF’s investment strategy, it is essential for a strategy to consider the elements such as the ones discussed to ensure the fund complies with regulations and meets member needs in retirement.

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When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

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