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Do you have to pay tax on super death benefits?

Posted on February 13, 2020 by admin

When someone dies, their superannuation usually gets transferred to their beneficiary as superannuation death benefits. Depending on who the beneficiary is, the benefits may be taxed in some circumstances.

If you are a beneficiary, the amount of tax you pay depends on factors such as:

Someone who is tax-dependant will:

Lump sum payments

Lump sum super benefits paid to tax-dependant beneficiaries are not taxed, whereas those who are not tax-dependent will need to pay more tax and will only be able to receive the benefit as a lump sum. Not all super death benefits paid to a non-tax dependant are subject to tax. There are tax-free components that are made up of contributions after-tax that the member made to their super.

The taxed element (where the member paid tax in their super) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy. The untaxed element (where the death benefit is being paid from an untaxed super fund or includes proceeds from a life insurance policy held by the fund) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy.

Income stream payments

If the death benefit is paid in the form of an income stream, the tax treatment of the payment is dependent on the age of the deceased and beneficiary at the time.

If the deceased or the beneficiary is aged 60 or over at the time of the benefactor’s death and the super is paid from a taxed super fund, then the payment will not be taxed. If the age of the deceased and the age of the beneficiary are both under 60, the taxable portion of income stream payments will be treated as assessable income but will be entitled to a tax offset equal to 15% of the amount.

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When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

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