radford tax logo
07 5495 4100 ◆

Do you have to pay tax on super death benefits?

Posted on February 13, 2020 by admin

When someone dies, their superannuation usually gets transferred to their beneficiary as superannuation death benefits. Depending on who the beneficiary is, the benefits may be taxed in some circumstances.

If you are a beneficiary, the amount of tax you pay depends on factors such as:

Someone who is tax-dependant will:

Lump sum payments

Lump sum super benefits paid to tax-dependant beneficiaries are not taxed, whereas those who are not tax-dependent will need to pay more tax and will only be able to receive the benefit as a lump sum. Not all super death benefits paid to a non-tax dependant are subject to tax. There are tax-free components that are made up of contributions after-tax that the member made to their super.

The taxed element (where the member paid tax in their super) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy. The untaxed element (where the death benefit is being paid from an untaxed super fund or includes proceeds from a life insurance policy held by the fund) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy.

Income stream payments

If the death benefit is paid in the form of an income stream, the tax treatment of the payment is dependent on the age of the deceased and beneficiary at the time.

If the deceased or the beneficiary is aged 60 or over at the time of the benefactor’s death and the super is paid from a taxed super fund, then the payment will not be taxed. If the age of the deceased and the age of the beneficiary are both under 60, the taxable portion of income stream payments will be treated as assessable income but will be entitled to a tax offset equal to 15% of the amount.

maximise your business's value

latest news

BAS lodging and government funding eligibility

Posted on April 2, 2020 by admin

As part of the second $66 billion support package in response to COVID-19 and its negative effects on the Australian economy, the Federal Government has expanded tax-free cash payments to small and medium businesses with a minimum payment of $20,000 and maximum of $100,000, up from the previous $2000 to $25,000 range.

However, it is important to note that payments are only given to eligible businesses after they lodge their BAS (business activity statements) by the 28 July and 28 October 2020 due dates.

The new enhanced scheme will be delivered in two phases:

  1. Employers are set to receive a first payment equal to 100% of their salary and wages withheld (a maximum of $50,000) when lodging their activity statements at quarterly due dates.
  2. An additional payment equal to the first payment made after businesses lodge their BAS by 28 July and 28 October 2020.

Businesses will receive payments based on their BAS lodgement schedules. For example, a business that receives a payment for the period up until June 2020 will receive the same amount for the period up until September 2020 upon the lodgement of their BAS in two separate occasions.

For monthly BAS lodgers, businesses will receive their first payment for the March 2020, April 2020, May 2020 and June 2020 lodgements, with a 300% calculation in the March activity statement to provide the same treatment as quarterly lodgers. Similarly, the second payment businesses which lodge their BAS monthly will be released once they lodge their June 2020, July 2020, August 2020 and September 2020 lodgements.

To remain eligible to receive the new government funding for small to medium-sized businesses, remember to lodge your BAS on time as per your usual schedule. There are several options you can consider to lodge your BAS:

  1. Lodge online through your myGov Business Portal
  2. Lodge through your tax or BAS agent (who can access your myGov)
  3. Lodge as “Nil BAS” if you have nothing report for the period online or through phone
  4. Lodge by mail
radford tax associationsradford tax associationsradford tax associations