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How Do You Make Sure Your Super Goes To The Right Person When You Die?

Posted on November 21, 2021 by admin

What happens to your super when you die? It might not be a question that has cropped up in many people’s minds, but it is something that you should be concerned about.

Upon the untimely death of someone, their superannuation may be one of the elements of the estate that can be bequeathed and divided between their loved ones (trustees of the estate and beneficiaries. 

This is not done through your will though, as it isn’t automatically included unless specific instructions have been given to your super fund. Often this is done through a binding death benefit nomination. These payments are usually paid out in lump sum payments and split between beneficiaries as dictated by the deceased.

However, like any property or asset that can be challenged, the death benefits from superannuation and SMSF can be a legal quandary if the appropriate succession planning measures have not been put into place.

Death benefits are one of the most commonly occurring legal issues that plague the superannuation and SMSF sector for individuals. Many court cases involving death benefits are the result of poor succession planning, as individuals who were not stated to be recipients of the payments miss out on what may be supposed to be theirs.

In the event of an individual’s death, the deceased’s dependent can be paid a death benefit payment as either a super income stream or a lump sum. The non-dependants of the deceased can only be paid in a lump sum. The form of the death benefit payment (and who receives it) will depend on the governing rules of your fund and the relevant requirements of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Regulations 1994 (SISR).

If succession planning around who the superannuation is to be left to is in place by the deceased, those who may be classed as dependents and non-dependents can become legally blurred.

In any event, dependents are defined differently depending on what kind of law they are being examined under (superannuation law and taxation law).

Under superannuation law, a death benefits dependant includes:

Under taxation law, a death benefits dependant includes:

Depending on the type of law that the beneficiary is classified under affects how they can interact with the death benefits.

How Do I Make Sure My Beneficiaries Will Receive The Death Benefits That I Want Them To Have? 

Death benefit payments need to be nominated by the holder of the superfund, as superannuation is not automatically included in your will. If you fail to make a nomination, your super fund may decide who receives your super money regardless of who is in your will.

That’s why succession planning is important when it comes to death benefits, no matter the situation. Even if you are at your healthiest, you’ll want to be prepared for any eventuality.

To get your succession planning right, here are 5 tips that will help you during the process.

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Looking To Upscale Your Business? Here’s What You Need To Know…

Posted on August 14, 2022 by admin

It’s a wonderful feeling when you have reached a point where your business is so successful that you need to upscale. Whether hiring more people or moving location, upscaling has its unique challenges. What can you do to ensure that you are hitting the ground running while upscaling?

Set Realistic And Actionable Goals

Businesses should set realistic and actionable small goals which they can work towards, rather than broad goals which provide no direction. Setting broad and unrealistic goals is demotivating and makes any progress made seem insignificant. Every person in the business should be given a target to meet over a reasonable timeline, contributing to achieving a larger goal.

Establish Standardised And Automated Processes

Small businesses can make the mistake of ‘doing things as they come’, but this means that as the business grows, adjusting to high-scale tasks is difficult. To avoid this, businesses should standardise all processes of work. Any individual placed into a role should be able to follow standardised procedures and yield a product that is of similar quality to the previous one. Investing money into automation tools is worthwhile for this procedure. This can include automating social media management, email, and customer relationships. Both of these will contribute to creating structures that support growth.

Identify Competitive Strengths And Weaknesses

Recognising the strengths and weaknesses of one’s business is essential. Strengths will allow businesses to hone in on their unique qualities, giving them a competitive advantage. Weaknesses will reveal which areas require growth so that changes can be made before upscaling takes place.

Network

Businesses should continue to develop relationships with service providers, sales channel partners, suppliers and customers. Keeping an open mind about partnerships or potential collaborations could open up different avenues of business growth.

Anticipate The Adjustment Pace.

No matter how prepared you feel, any change in an organisation will require a period of adjustment for the rest of your team. Give them time to recognise the need for change and accept this opportunity’s challenges. More importantly, they need time to understand their roles in the bigger picture of your organisation’s plans to scale and determine how they can make the most of their skill sets and add value to the company. Make sure to consider adjustment protocols and allocate a reasonable period for such adjustments in your scaling plans and process.

Outsourcing The Non-Essentials

As the business increases in stature, there will be a lot more little and frustrating tasks, meaning that you can’t focus on what’s important. Outsourcing components like payroll or marketing to companies with the professionals to do it effectively means that you can focus on upscaling the business.

Upscaling can be very stressful, but whether it’s making changes to your business’s technology or outsourcing things in the short term, to upscale a business means focusing on what is best for your business.

To get to this point, you’ve made a success of it, so it’s important not to lose your identity in the process. Upscaling your business is taking what’s great about your current operation and building it outwards.

If you are looking towards how your business can take itself to the next level, business planning for any eventualities can be of benefit. Consulting with a trusted adviser can be of great help when moving forward in your business’s upscaling endeavour.

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