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How to get the most out of your bank account

Posted on October 29, 2020 by admin

Banking is often more complicated than you expect it to be with different types of accounts, fees and fine print to take into consideration. You are able to get more out of your bank account if you pay closer attention to certain details.

Re-evaluate your bank

Due to the competitive market space, new offers that might be much better suited to your needs than the 10-year-old bank account you are using may be available. Keep a lookout for these offers so that your bank account is helping you put more money into your pocket.

You should also consider changing accounts if your bank is asking you to pay high fees or requires a high minimum balance. You may find that other banks are offering better options or attempt to renegotiate terms of your account with your current bank.

Don’t assume your bank is giving you the best rate

Your bank may not be giving you competitive rates and assuming that they will do right by you lets them get away with this. Make sure that you keep up to date with different types of rates and what they should be. Discuss these with your bank and how they might be able to give you more competitive rates to the ones you are currently receiving.

Plan interactions with your bank strategically

Other than when it’s regarding an urgent matter, plan interactions with your bank ahead of time. For example, if you need to visit the bank about your mortgage, aim to have a mortgage specialist with you, this will ensure that you get the best out of your visit.

You may be able to resolve your request by calling the bank. In this case, aim to call in off-peak hours to reduce waiting time. Before you call, make sure you’ve checked whether the bank has provided an online method to complete the process.

Don’t forget cards and bank accounts you don’t use

Carrying a spare credit or debit card is okay as long as you aren’t being charged annual fees on it. If you find that you rarely use the card but it has a high annual fee, it might not be worth continuing to pay for it.

The same applies to bank accounts that you may not be using or using rarely. Banks may charge a dormant account fee if there is no activity in the account over a period of time (check details that apply to your bank). However, using your bank account every few months should be enough to prevent dormant account fees from being charged.

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The risks involved in debt consolidation

Posted on November 24, 2020 by admin

Debt consolidation is a form of refinancing which involves taking one larger loan out to pay off multiple small ones. Although this might make managing repayments easier, you may end up paying more money interest rate or fees. 

There will be companies that make offers which are too good to be true. If you feel that an offer is unrealistic and the company is promising that they can get you out of debt no matter what your situation is, you should reevaluate using their services. Don’t trust companies that: 

The goal behind the consolidation is to manage your payments, not create more fees and interest for you. Therefore, before signing onto an agreement, check how consolidation compares with your current fees and interest rates altogether. Also, take into account expenses and penalties associated with your existing loans and whether you will have to pay more money for paying off your loan early. If the expenses work out to be more, it might not be worth going through this entire process. 

Debt consolidation isn’t the only option if you’re struggling with repayments. Other options may be available which are more suited to you. You should discuss with your mortgage provider, credit provider or financial advisors to determine if there is anything that can be done. 

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