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Illegal super schemes

Posted on March 31, 2016 by admin

Australian taxpayers should be aware that some promoters claim to offer early access to super savings by transferring a person’s super into a self-managed super fund.

These schemes are illegal and heavy penalties will apply to those who participate in such schemes.

Generally, individuals cannot access their super until they retire or meet a condition of release.

Some people promoting illegal super schemes will say that they can help access a person’s super now to pay off credit card debt, buy a house or car, or go on holiday. These schemes are illegal and may cost those who engage in them a lot more than the super they access.

Illegal super schemes usually involve a promoter offering to help a person access their super early. Promoters of illegal super schemes usually:

Those who participate in one of these schemes may become a victim of identity theft. Identity theft happens when someone uses another person’s personal details to commit fraud or other crimes. Once a person’s identity has been stolen and misused, it can take years to fix.

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When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

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