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Rates increase for fuel tax credits

Posted on February 16, 2017 by admin

Fuel tax credit rates increased on 1 February 2017. These rates are indexed twice a year, in February and August, in line with the consumer price index (CPI).

The rates vary depending on when you acquire the fuel, what fuel you use and the activity you use it for. Rates may also change for fuel used in a heavy vehicle for travelling on public roads. This is due to changes to the road user charge which is reviewed annually.

If you claim less than $10,000 in fuel tax credits each year, there are now simpler ways to record and calculate your claim. For the BAS period ending 31 March 2016 and onwards, you can:
– Use one rate in a BAS period – the rate that applies at the end of the BAS period
– Work out your litre based on the cost of the fuel you purchased.

To check which rate applies for your business, visit the Australian Tax Office (ATO) website or contact our office. Remember, there are time limits for claiming fuel tax credits, making adjustments and correcting errors – generally, you must claim or amend your claim within four years.

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When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

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