radford tax logo
07 5495 4100 ◆

Winding up a SMSF

Posted on September 5, 2018 by admin

The Tax Office is reminding individuals winding up a self-managed super fund (SMSF) that before lodging your final SMSF annual return, you must first have an audit completed by an approved SMSF auditor.

When lodging your SMSF annual return, answer Question 9 in Section A: ‘Was the fund wound up during the income year?’. You should also look to complete Question M in Section D: Supervisory levy adjustment for wound up funds. By doing so, you will reduce the SMSF supervisory levy you must pay, so you do not have to pay the levy the following year.

Remember also to pay any outstanding tax liabilities and lodge any outstanding returns. Otherwise, you may be subjected to compliance assessments and risk penalties.

The Tax Office will send you a letter of confirmation of your wound up fund, which will include:
– confirmation your SMSF’s ABN is cancelled, and
– your SMSF’s record is closed on the ATO’s system.

Avoid closing your bank accounts until all expected final liabilities have been settled and requested refunds received. You can pay outstanding tax liabilities, including the supervisory levy when you lodge your final SMSF annual return.

maximise your business's value

latest news

When do you have to pay tax on shares?

Posted on February 20, 2020 by admin

Investing in shares is a popular method of growing your wealth, however, there are tax obligations you need to be aware of to get an accurate sense of how much you’ll need to put aside for your investments.

When you own shares, you need to declare all your dividend income on your tax return. It is possible to claim tax deductions for certain expenses you pay to receive income from your shares. The deductions you are eligible for will depend on if you are carrying on a business of share trading or if you are an individual share investor, but they can include:

Individual share investors cannot claim a deduction for the cost of acquiring shares, such as costs for brokerage and stamp duty, however, they can claim deductions on the prepayment of expenses related to the shares such as internet fees or seminars.

Buying and selling shares can involve capital gains tax (CGT), depending on whether you make a capital gain or a capital loss on your shares. Your capital gains or loss is the difference between the price you paid for the shares and the price you sell them for. If you end up selling your shares for more than you paid for them, then you make a capital gain which may be taxed.

How much CGT you need to pay varies depending on:

radford tax associationsradford tax associationsradford tax associations